Performance Enhancing Drugs

Alex Rodriguez and Biogenesis scandal have sports networks losing focus

Radio Announcer

At a time when Major League Baseball pennant races are typically the topic of sports news, some sports networks focus on Alex Rodriguez and performance enhancing drugs.

Major League Baseball has the longest and richest history of the major sports leagues dating back to 1869. As July ends, and August begins, Major League Baseball pennant races are typically the topic of sports news.  Sadly, in 2013, Alex Rodriguez and a now defunct clinic known as Biogenesis of America dominate the talk on televison and radio sports reports.

Listening to a major sports network for over an hour on the morning drive to work today, every mention of Major League Baseball was about the possible suspensions of Alex Rodriguez and a handful of unnamed players implicated in the Biogenesis performance enhancing drug scandal.

Sadly, there was no mention of the Pittsburgh Pirates having their best season in twenty years.  A story that has many casual baseball fans rooting for a team that is not only trying to break out of their slump of twenty losing seasons, but currently fighting for the lead in their division.

Instead of what teams are the surprising winners and losers, or what players are hot or not, the talk was on legal and medical issues. Doctors, lawyers, and anyone who is an expert at something remotely related to performance enhancing drugs and drug related scandals are being interviewed. These experts are questioned on legal and medical aspects of a now defunct clinic known as Biogenesis of America. Talk focuses on  how the clinic allegedly sold performance enhancing drugs to professional athletes.

Why are performance enhancing drugs illegal?

Should performance enhancing drugs be accepted in sports?

As a society we have an obligation to maintain public safety.

In our lifetime we often make decisions where we must identify risks and assess risks. If something has the potential to cause you harm, you should be aware of the risks.

If an athlete is clearly made aware of the risks, should they have the right to use substances created in the laboratory to enhance their performance?

But that's not fair!


As a society do we have an obligation to maintain fairness? Isn't science and technology already creating a competitive edge for those who can afford it?

What about the athletes that have armies of scientists, nutritionists, coaches, and physical therapists choreographing their every move?

Sports medicine has progressed so much in recent years, but does every athlete have the same access to these advancements?

Does a third world athlete have access to the same nutritionists, the same scientists, as someone from a more developed nation?

What about the families that mortgage their future, put their lives in hock to give their child athletes access to world class trainers who are known for developing world class athletes?

Is it fair?  Do you care that it is fair?

Subscribe to RSS - Performance Enhancing Drugs